A woman reacts as pastors gather outside while Greg McMichael, his son Travis McMichael and William “Roddie” Bryan are tried in the Glynn County Courthouse over the killing of Ahmaud Arbery, in Brunswick, Georgia, U.S., November 18, 2021

A woman reacts as pastors gather outside while Greg McMichael, his son Travis McMichael and William “Roddie” Bryan are tried in the Glynn County Courthouse over the killing of Ahmaud Arbery, in Brunswick, Georgia, U.S., November 18, 2021

Travis McMichael
A woman reacts as pastors gather outside while Greg McMichael, his son Travis McMichael and William “Roddie” Bryan are tried in the Glynn County Courthouse over the killing of Ahmaud Arbery, in Brunswick, Georgia, U.S., November 18, 2021—

Three men were found guilty for murdering Ahmaud Arbery in a decision that bookends an emotionally taxing few weeks for Black activists.

However, regardless of the trial’s outcome, activists say between the Kyle Rittenhouse trial and the parallel Travis, Greg McMichael and William Bryan proceedings, the history of white armed vigilantism doesn’t seem to go away even with justice in the criminal legal system.

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“It really is this pattern that has always existed in America being brought to the forefront,” Ben Crump, who represented Arbery’s family, told Insider. “We are now making it legitimate for lynch mobs to go out and engage in vigilantism.”

Arbery, then 25, was jogging in Brunswick, Georgia when he was fatally shot by Travis McMichael, who was joined by his father, Gregory, and neighbor, William “Roddie” Bryan as they confronted, chased, then killed Arbery.

 

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