US government gives financial compensation to relatives of 10 people mistakenly killed by the American military in a drone strike on the Afghan capital, Kabul, in August.

US government gives financial compensation to relatives of 10 people mistakenly killed by the American military in a drone strike on the Afghan capital, Kabul, in August.

American military
US government gives financial compensation to relatives of 10 people mistakenly killed by the American military in a drone strike on the Afghan capital, Kabul, in August.—

An aid worker and nine members of his family, including seven children, died in the strike.

The Pentagon said it was also working to help surviving members of the family relocate to the US.

The strike took place days before the US military withdrew from Afghanistan.

It came amid a frenzied evacuation effort following the Taliban’s sudden return to power and only days after a devastating attack close to Kabul’s airport by IS-K, a local branch of the Islamic State (IS) group.

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US intelligence had tracked the aid worker’s car for eight hours on 29 August, believing it was linked to IS-K militants, US Central Command’s Gen Kenneth McKenzie said last month.

The compensation offer was made on Thursday in a meeting between Colin Kahl, the under-secretary of defence for policy, and Steven Kwon, the founder and president of an aid group active in Afghanistan called Nutrition and Education International, the Pentagon said in a statement.

Mr Kahl noted Mr Ahmadi and others who were killed “were innocent victims who bore no blame and were not affiliated with ISIS-K or threats to US forces”, said a statement attributed to Defence Department spokesman John Kirby.

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He reiterated Secretary of Defence Lloyd Austin’s commitment to the families, including “condolence payments”.

Mr Austin has apologised for the attack, but Mr Ahmadi’s 22-year-old nephew Farshad Haidari said that was not enough.

“They must come here and apologise to us face-to-face,” he told the AFP news agency in Kabul.

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